Tattoo Ink or Cancer Cells

Getting Tattoo these days is a very common practice, almost in every corner of the world. But what if you came to know that your tattoo has given you the deadly disease – CANCER? Frightened! This really happened. Read more to cover the story.

Getting Tattoo Or Cancer

Imagine a day when you hear from your doctor that you have cervical cancer. Further, imagine that the tests that were conducted prior to your surgery reported that the cancer had also affected your lymph nodes. After experiencing a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus), salpingectomy (removal of the Fallopian tube) AND dissection of your lymph nodes, what if you find that the cancer had NOT spread after all!!!! What were diagnosed as the cancer cells in your lymph nodes were actually traces of…. the tattoo ink!!!!!!

This is the real incidence in California. Have a look to know more.

It’s obvious that if you’re in doubt of having cancer, you doctor may want to first consider the ink, if you’ve tats etched on your body.

One cervical cancer Californian patient recently received some frightening news after her bodyscan — the report showed that her cancer had spread to the lymph nodes in her pelvis and the nodes needed to be detached.
After undergoing the operation for removing her lymph nodes and performing a hysterectomy to rid her body of the cancer, the doctors came across a shocking and unfortunate discovery.
The lady had a tattoo on the infected thighs. The tat ink from her thighs had been absorbed by her lymph nodes that were detected in the body scan. This means that the cells in her lymph nodes were not the cancer cells — it was just the ink effect

Why This Happened?

“When you tattoo, some of that ink will be absorbed in the cells in the lymphatic system and migrate to levels of lymph nodes,” said gynecologic surgeon Ramez N. Eskander, MD, in an interview with CBS News Los Angeles.
To facilitate body can, a positron emission tomography (PET) is used to detect cancer by lighting up in the presence of cancer cells. In the woman’s case, the PET misinterpreted cancer cells for her tat ink — lighting up when it detected the ink inside the lymph nodes.

The lymph nodes, according to the American Cancer Society, are structures in the body that fight infection by purifying out germs carried by the body’s lymph system (a collection of vessels that maintain the body’s immunity).

Preventing the spread of cancer, which already reached the lymph nodes required radiation therapy that attacks the cancer cells with high levels of radiation. Radiation therapy can have numerous negative side effects, like skin and salivary gland damage, fibrosis (the scarring and thickening of connective tissue) and memory loss, according to the National Cancer Institute,

Dr. Eskander who operated the lady said that he hopes this incident will spread awareness about considering tattoo ink after conducting PET scans.
“When there is a PET scan that shows a bright lymph node, if a patient has significant tattoos or body art, then you have to be cognizant that these might be false positives,” Dr. Eskander said.
The woman luckily survived and has been cancer-free since her surgery and is fine now, CBS News reports.
“She was thrilled to share her story with everyone, but she never indicated she regretted the tattoos,” Dr. Eskander said.
This case study was published in the July issue of the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Precautions To Avoid Such Circumstances In Real

Although, this was mere a fault by the doctors, but you should take preventive measures to avoid such circumstances in your life.
• Choose a tattoo artist who is popular, qualified, knowledgeable and registered. This is because a qualified artist will well understand the consequences of an improper and unhealthy tattoo service.
• After the tattoo is done, take proper healing measures so that you don’t get infection over the tattoo skin area.
• Take a healthy diet after tattoo
• Consult doctor when in doubt.

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