Prevent Diabetes – National Diabetes Prevention program

Looking at the current figures, around 86 million American adults are having prediabetes and one-third of this number is likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes within next 5 years if they are not treated. Type 2 diabetes is known to have serious complications like blindness, amputation, heart disease and kidney failure.
But a program called as National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) has taken the initiative to spread awareness about prediabetes among people.

Diabetes Prevention Program

The community based program National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) works to replicate the results of National Institutes of Health clinical trial. As per the trial there was a significant reduction in the number of people with prediabetes with 58 percent overall reductions in new cases of diabetes and 71 percent reduction among people above 60 years of age.
This reduction is a result of just 5 to 7 percent of weight loss of total body weight. The results have been used to provide an effective and low-cost program for individuals who are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Need To Cover National DPP Plan Under Medicare

The National DPP plan is still not covered under Medicare despite the results which have proved to be effective and still more than half of people above 65 years of age have prediabetes.
The American Medical Association (AMA) along with the American Diabetes Association have put a proposal before Congress to pass the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of 2015 making the diabetes prevention program part of Medicare.
Due to the effective health outcomes many big public and private organizations have created the infrastructure to facilitate large-scale participation in these programs. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention give in-person and virtual training for lifestyle coaches and the recognition program for National DPP providers.

Spreading Diabetes Awareness

At present, around 90 percent of people aren’t aware of the fact that they have prediabetes. The American Diabetes Association has come up with a type 2 diabetes risk test to spread awareness among individuals about their present status of diabetes and help them to take preventive measures for it.
The AMA, Y-USA and local YMCAs are working to provide help to physicians and care teams to find out people with diabetes through tests and recommend those at high risk of type 2 diabetes to local centers of National DPP.
For now, the National DPP plan is being covered by eight states for state employees. The country is spending huge sums of money to treat people who are suffering from diabetes.
But this is high time when every one of us should take a step forward to spread awareness about diabetes and also Congress should pass the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act.

How To Lower The Risk Of Diabetes?

Loose Few Pounds Of Weight

As already stated above, excess weight puts you at higher risk of type 2 diabetes. If you are overweight, you have 20 to 40 times more chance of developing diabetes as compared to a normal person.
So, work on to lose 7 to 10 percent of your present weight to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes.

Cut Off Sugary Drinks From Your Diet

Sugary beverages have high glycemic levels and consuming this increases your risk of diabetes. Even the fruit drinks which are portrayed as healthy diet choices through advertisements are not at all a good choice. Consuming excess of sugar based drinks lead to weight gain. Moreover, these drinks lead to chronic inflammation, high triglycerides, decreased (HDL) cholesterol, and increased insulin resistance. All these factors lead you to diabetes. So, it’s better to take tea, coffee, green tea with low sugar which can prove as beneficial for your health.

Give Up Smoking:

Smoking brings along many chronic diseases and type 2 diabetes is one of them. Smokers are at 50 percent higher risk than non-smokers. Thus, the best idea is to give up smoking today!

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