Everything you need to Know About the Paleo Diet

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“You need to give up modern foods to reap the benefits in true sense“. Are you ready? If you’re among those decided to follow a paleo diet, here’s a lot more to know before your reach any decision.

Paleo diet, also known as the Stone-age diet or hunter-gathered diet is talk of the town these days. it usually starts and unfortunately ends too with just one question, “What will the caveman eat?” But, there’s a lot more for you to know.

Here is everything about a paleo diet: the paleo menu, pros and cons, and what a modern person needs to know to decide whether or not to take the paleo diet plunge.

The Premise
The paleo diet is typically based on the foods our hunter-gather ancestors ate: vegetables, fruits, meat, seafood, and nuts. According to Loren Cordain, PhD, professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University and author of The Paleo Diet, “By following these nutritional guidelines, we put our diet more in line with the evolutionary pressures that shaped our current genetics, which in turn positively influences health and wellbeing.

He says paleo diet reduces the body’s glycemic load and has a healthy ratio of saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acids, raises vitamin and nutrient consumption, and contains an optimal balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.

What’s on the menu?
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh meat— it is all about eating foods straight from the Earth. Cordain advises people to have grass-fed and organic food whenever possible to limit exposure to pesticides, antibiotics, and other chemicals that didn’t exist back. As per the Research from Emory University, Paleolithic people obtained about 35% of their calories from fats, 35% from carbohydrates, and 30% from protein. Amazing!!

Packaged Food

 

Say No to Packed Food
Anything that comes in a box, jar, or bag should be avoided when on paleo diet. —, According to Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, paleo expert, and author of The Paleo Solution, this means no grains, dairy, added salt, or legumes including peanuts, beans, lentils, and soybeans. While potatoes are generally forbidden on the diet, it is okay to eat sparingly as long as you earn them through exercise. Alcohol and honey are also generally considered no paleo, but red wine tends to be the closest option to be a paleo drink.

Paleo is a lifestyle
“The paleo diet is by no means a temporary diet,” says Cordain. “It’s like a lifestyle, as it was thousands of years ago. You don’t just stop it if and when you start feeling better or reach your goal weight—you stick it out for the long haul”, he further adds.

Paleo isn’t just about food
Besides food, exercise is a vital part of the live-by-your-genetic-code equation. Stone Age living meant a constant on-the-go lifestyle, which required 4,000-plus calories a day, as per reports of David L. Katz, MD, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. Even people who hit the gym regularly won’t need to eat that many calories, but the principle of using food as fuel to exercise still stands.

It’s impossible to completely copy our ancestors
“Our ancestors never chased cows and chickens around. They hunted antelopes, buffalo, and probably some animals we’ve never heard of. Their meat was generally quite lean, and provided healthier omega 3s than meats from modern days, even the grass-fed ones”, according to Dr. Katz.

Paleo diet requires a lot of planning, preparation time, and mental peace. For example, eating out on the diet isn’t as easy as ordering chicken and a salad. A lot of factors are to be considered – oil in which the chicken was cooked, if the salad toppings was processed, or packaged, etc.

“As with every elimination diet, it’s just not doable long term,” Dr. Ochner says. Weight loss is far from the sole purpose of eating paleo as going on and off of the diet can lead to big weight swings. Hence, it is not easy to follow a paleo diet.

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